Playing Chicken.

 

“Don’t have anything to do with foolish and stupid arguments, because you know they produce quarrels. 24And the LORD’s servant must not be quarrelsome but must be kind to everyone, able to teach, not resentful. 25Opponents must be gently instructed, in the hope that God will grant them repentance leading them to a knowledge of the truth,” -2 Timothy 2:23-25

chickies

A few months ago, a friend and I were driving home at night from a fun time out with friends.  We took the highway and I got off at my usual exit, but unfortunately found out that the road had been closed temporarily due to construction. So we turned and went down a different, dark, back road that we hoped we lead us back to where we needed to be. We went down for a ways and realized it was not taking us where we needed to go so we turned back around and headed back for the highway.

It was very dark out there and it was only two lanes with no real shoulder on the road.  We saw ahead of us what looked like one car passing another. The car that we assumed was passing was in my lane but they were a ways away so I assumed they’d get back in their lane before reaching us.

But they got closer. And closer. And they were still side by side with the other car.

Suddenly, I realized that they were not going to move.

So I quickly pulled off the side of the road-luckily not falling in the ditch below-as these two cars raced by at lightning speed.

They were racing. Playing chicken. With our lives and theirs.

I am very blessed and lucky to say that we did not lose our lives that day, but I think about it often.

Many of us do not like to try anything like that. Risking our lives and seeing who will give first-making it a matter of life or death.

But we do it often when it comes to arguing with others-especially those we love.

Who can be the meanest?

Who will play the victim?

Who will give in?

Who would rather ruin the friendship than lose the fight?

In 2 Timothy 2:23-25, it is discussed how it is a waste of time to fight over silly things. Instead we should focus on the good and come to agreements about things in a civil way. Not in a mean way, not with anger, not with malice. To make it a calm talk in which something is agreed upon together.

But that is easier said than done.

If we quit playing chicken, and offered to listen to another’s side before ours, what good could it do for our world?

-Kristin

 

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